31 Fabulous Fig Varieties for Your Home and Garden


There are over 800 varieties of fig trees. Figs are in the genus Ficus and belong to the mulberry (Moraceae) family. They are native to Asia and the Mediterranean region. Fiddle leaf figs (Ficus lyrata) are ever-popular houseplants, while common figs (Ficus carica) are known for their tasty edible fruits. These woody trees or shrubs yield an amazing diversity of colors, sizes, and flavors.

Keep reading to learn more about 31 fabulous varieties of fig that you can grow in your home garden!

Where Can You Grow Fig Trees?

If you live in USDA Plant Hardiness zones 6 to 10, you can grow figs outdoors in your landscape. Colder zone growers can keep them in containers to protect the plants from harsh winters. Fig trees are fast-growing, vigorous, and easy to grow, producing abundant, soft, edible fruits. They also make valuable wildlife trees. Specialized pollinators rely on the pollen, and fruit-eating birds will savor the fruits and use the trees as shelter.

Most figs grow best in full sun, although they will tolerate some dappled shade. Fig trees have a broadly spreading root system and prefer organically rich, moist, well-drained soil. The soil pH should be neutral to slightly acidic. Mulch around the base of the plant to help keep the roots moist and protect your plant from winter freezes.

Fig trees typically grow 10 to 30 feet tall and equally wide and require plenty of space. Dwarf fig varieties stay much smaller and can be pruned for compact growth in container gardens. Figs are a superb option if you want to create an edible landscape or if you enjoy walking out into your yard mid-summer and harvesting your own delicious fruit.

Edible varieties are divided into three categories based on the time of year that they yield:

  • Early season figs yield in May through June in most climates
  • Mid-season figs yield from late June through September
  • Late season figs fruit from August through October

Here are the best cultivars for home gardeners.

‘Alma’

Close-up of ripe Ficus carica 'Alma' fruit among large, lobed, dark green foliage. The fruit is medium-sized, pear-shaped, has greenish-purple skin with a smooth and thin texture.
This mid-season fig variety yields medium-sized, sweet fruits in varied climates.
botanical-name
botanical name


Ficus carica ‘Alma’
sun-requirements
sun requirements


Full sun
height
height


8 – 10 feet
hardiness-zones
hardiness zones


7 – 10

‘Alma’ is a mid-season fig cultivar. It produces fruit with a juicy composition and rich, sweet flavor. The figs have a brown skin with brown flesh.

The trees are generally smaller than average and perform well in dry and humid environments. ‘Alma’ fig trees are vigorous growers and produce an abundant crop.

‘Atreano’

Close-up of ripe fruits of Ficus carica 'Atreano' among blurred green foliage. The medium to large-sized figs of 'Atreano' are characterized by their light green to yellowish-green skin, tinged with a touch of purple when fully ripe.
This compact fig tree does well in dry climates.
botanical-name
botanical name


Ficus carica ‘Atreano’
sun-requirements
sun requirements


Full sun
height
height


8 – 10 feet
hardiness-zones
hardiness zones


6 – 10 

‘Atreano’ is a mid-season producer. These trees are fast-growing and productive but stay relatively compact. The figs are large with yellow-green skin and amber-pink flesh.

The taste is reminiscent of a blend of berries and melons. ‘Atreano’ performs well in more dry environmental conditions. 

‘Black Madeira’

Close-up of a man's hand holding a ripe Ficus carica 'Black Madeira' fruit against a blurred green background. The fruit is medium in size, with intense dark purple to black skin.
This variety is a productive, late-season tree with rich flavored figs.
botanical-name
botanical name


Ficus carica ‘Black Madeira’
sun-requirements
sun requirements


Full sun
height
height


8 – 15 feet
hardiness-zones
hardiness zones


6 – 10

‘Black Madeira’ is a late-season producer. The fruit is medium-sized and has excellent flavor. They have black skin with red flesh and a fruity, berry-like taste. ‘Black Madeira’ trees are very productive and perform well in more dry environments. 

‘Black Mission’

Close-up of ripe fruits on a Ficus carica 'Black Mission' tree. The medium to large-sized figs of 'Black Mission' are known for their striking deep purple to almost black skin when fully ripe. The tree produces large, deeply lobed leaves that are bright, glossy green.
This is a popular, mid-season fig that’s tolerant of dry conditions.
botanical-name
botanical name


Ficus carica ‘Black Mission’
sun-requirements
sun requirements


Full sun
height
height


15 – 30 feet
hardiness-zones
hardiness zones


6 – 10

‘Black Mission’ is a very popular fig cultivar often seen in farmer’s market stands and grocery stores. These trees ripen their fruit around mid-season. The fruits are oblong, somewhat pear-shaped, and have a sweet, berry-like flavor.

They have dark, purple-to-black skin with dark pink flesh. ‘Black Mission’ trees are hardy and productive, performing well in dry environments. 

‘Brooklyn White’

Close-up of ripe fruits on a Ficus carica 'Brooklyn White' tree among bright green lobed foliage. The fruits are medium in size, have yellow-green skin and are slightly pear-shaped.
This fig tree yields two early-season crops of medium-sized fruits with berry-melon flavor, hardy and productive.
botanical-name
botanical name


Ficus carica ‘Brooklyn White’
sun-requirements
sun requirements


Full sun
height
height


10 – 20 feet
hardiness-zones
hardiness zones


6 – 10 

‘Brooklyn White’ is an early-season cultivar that produces two crops. The fruits are medium-sized and taste like a cross between berries and melon. ‘Brooklyn White’ trees are hardy and very productive.

‘Brown Turkey’

Close-up of ripe fruit on a Ficus carica 'Brown Turkey' tree in a sunny garden. The fruit is large, pear-shaped with deep purple-brown skin.
This popular and easy-to-grow variety produces large figs and is resilient in various climates.
botanical-name
botanical name


Ficus carica ‘Brown Turkey’
sun-requirements
sun requirements


Full sun
height
height


10 – 25 feet
hardiness-zones
hardiness zones


6 – 10

‘Brown Turkey’ figs are a popular variety readily available for purchase. These trees are easy to grow, vigorous, and productive. The fruit is large and sweet, with reddish-brown skin and brown flesh.

‘Brown Turkey’ trees are fairly cold-hardy, and even if the tree dies back to the roots in the winter, they will resprout the following spring. These trees perform well in both humid and dry environments.

‘Calimyrna’

Close-up of ripe Ficus carica 'Calimyrna' fruit among large, bright green, lobed leaves that add to its overall lush and vibrant appearance. The fruit is characterized by a pale yellowish-green skin with a slightly wrinkled texture.
This variety is often sold commercially and has a delicious melon taste.
botanical-name
botanical name


Ficus carica ‘Calimyrna’
sun-requirements
sun requirements


Full sun
height
height


8 – 10 feet
hardiness-zones
hardiness zones


7 – 10

‘Calimyrna’ is a popular fig cultivar widely sold commercially, particularly as a dried fruit. They have a fruity melon taste.

The fruits are very large, with yellow skin and pink flesh. The seeds inside ‘Calimyrna’ are slightly crunchy and make an interesting texture when dried. 

‘Celeste’

Close-up of ripe Ficus carica 'Celeste' fruit on a branch in a sunny garden. The fruit is pear-shaped, medium in size, with light brown to violet-brown skin.
A popular, early-season fig, ‘Celeste’ has small to medium-sized, sweet, berry-like fruits.
botanical-name
botanical name


Ficus carica ‘Celeste’
sun-requirements
sun requirements


Full sun
height
height


5 – 10 feet
hardiness-zones
hardiness zones


6 – 10

‘Celeste’ is a popular fig variety, especially in the southeastern United States, and should be readily available for purchase. These trees are hardy and productive, and they grow well in a humid environment. ‘Celeste’ is an early-season producer.

The fruits are small to medium-sized with greenish-purple skin and pink flesh. Their taste is a sweet berry-like flavor. These are fast-growing trees that bear fruit 1-2 years after planting.

‘Chicago Hardy’

Close-up of Ficus carica 'Chicago Hardy' in a sunny garden. The tree produces large, lobed leaves that are dark green in color with pale green veins. The medium-sized fig features a brownish-purple skin.
This hardy fig thrives in cooler climates and is known for its productivity and juicy, berry-flavored fruits.
botanical-name
botanical name


Ficus carica ‘Chicago Hardy’
sun-requirements
sun requirements


Full sun
height
height


15 – 30 feet
hardiness-zones
hardiness zones


6 – 10

‘Chicago Hardy’ is an early-season producer. This popular variety does very well in cooler climates and tolerates humid environments.

The trees are hardy and productive. The fruit is medium-sized and juicy with beautiful purple skin, red flesh, and a berry-like flavor.  

‘Conadria’

Close-up of ripe, halved Ficus carica 'Conadria' fruit on a wooden surface. The fruit is medium-sized, pear-shaped, with yellowish-green skin and juicy, amber-colored flesh.
Mid-season ‘Conadria’ figs are large and sweet, with melon or berry-like flavor.
botanical-name
botanical name


Ficus carica ‘Conadria’
sun-requirements
sun requirements


Full sun
height
height


10 feet
hardiness-zones
hardiness zones


6 – 10

‘Conadria’ is a mid-season producer. The fruits are large with distinct green to yellowish skin and pale pink flesh, with a sweet melon-like flavor. The tree is tolerant of drier environments.

‘Desert King’

Close-up of ripe and unripe fruits on a Ficus carica 'Desert King' tree in the garden. The medium to large-sized figs of 'Desert King' feature a light green to yellowish-green skin, with a slightly pink blush when fully ripe.
These reliable early-season figs thrive in cooler regions.
botanical-name
botanical name


Ficus carica ‘Desert King’
sun-requirements
sun requirements


Full sun
height
height


15 – 25 feet
hardiness-zones
hardiness zones


6 – 10

‘Desert King’ is a reliable early-season fig cultivar. These trees do well in the Northwest and cooler environments. The fruits are medium-sized with green skin and red flesh. ‘Desert King’ is a very productive tree that will produce plenty of sweet and delicious fruits.

‘Excel’

Close-up of ripe Ficus carica 'Excel' fruit on a tree among green foliage against a blurred background of a sunny garden. The fruits are medium-sized, pear-shaped, have a bright green skin with small yellowish marks throughout the surface.
These mid-to-late-season figs are sweet, resistant to splitting, and produce well in various climates.
botanical-name
botanical name


Ficus carica ‘Excel’
sun-requirements
sun requirements


Full sun
height
height


12 – 15 feet
hardiness-zones
hardiness zones


7 – 10

‘Excel’ is a mid to late-season producer. The fruits are medium to large-sized and resistant to splitting. They have yellow-green skin with golden brown flesh. The flavor is sweet, juicy, and honey-like. ‘Excel’ performs well in both dry and humid climates.

‘Flanders’

Close-up of ripe Ficus carica 'Flanders' fruit on a tree among large, lobed, bright green foliage. The fruit is medium-sized, pear-shaped, with greenish-brown skin.
These late-season figs thrive in dry conditions, yielding firm, sweet fruits that are resistant to splitting.
botanical-name
botanical name


Ficus carica ‘Flanders’
sun-requirements
sun requirements


Full sun
height
height


12 – 20 feet
hardiness-zones
hardiness zones


7 – 10

‘Flanders’ is a late-season fig variety. It prefers more dry environments and does not perform well with high humidity. ‘Flanders’ will produce an abundance of medium-sized fruits that are firm and resistant to splitting. The fruits have brown skin with pinkish-orange flesh and a fruity honey-like flavor.

‘Florea’

Close-up of ripe fruit on a Ficus carica 'Florea' tree among large, bright green, lobed foliage. This dwarf fig tree produces small-sized fig with a reddish-brown to purple skin.
These early-season cool-climate trees are reliable, hardy, and have small, sugary fruits.
botanical-name
botanical name


Ficus carica ‘Florea’
sun-requirements
sun requirements


Full sun
height
height


10 – 20 feet
hardiness-zones
hardiness zones


6 – 10

‘Florea’ is an early-season producer that performs well in cooler climates. It also does well with high humidity and relatively dry soil. These trees are reliable and hardy. The fruits are small with a sugary berry-like flavor. ‘Florea’ fruits have a beautiful reddish-brown skin with light brown flesh. 

‘Ischia Black’

Close-up of ripe purple fruits on a Ficus carica 'Ischia Black' tree against a blurred background of dark green lobed leaves. The large-sized, pear-shaped figs exhibit a deep, almost black, purple skin when ripe.
These late-season figs are medium-sized, prolific, rich in flavor, and resistant to splitting.
botanical-name
botanical name


Ficus carica ‘Ischia Black’
sun-requirements
sun requirements


Full sun
height
height


10 – 20 feet
hardiness-zones
hardiness zones


7 – 9

‘Ischia Black’ is a late-season fig cultivar. The fruits have black skin with amber-red flesh. They are elongated and have an excellent, rich flavor. The fruits are medium-sized, prolific, and resistant to splitting. 

‘Kadota’

Close-up of green fruit on Ficus carica 'Kadota' tree. This is a classic fig cultivar with medium to large-sized fruits that are characterized by their light green to yellowish-green skin.The fig tree itself features large, lobed leaves, contributing to the overall lush and vibrant appearance
These early-season ‘Kadota’ figs have a juicy, sweet, honey-like flavor.
botanical-name
botanical name


Ficus carica ‘Kadota’
sun-requirements
sun requirements


Full sun
height
height


15 – 25 feet
hardiness-zones
hardiness zones


6 – 10

‘Kadota’ is an early-season fig cultivar. It produces medium-sized fruits with yellow-green skin and golden-brown flesh. The fruits are juicy with a sweet honey-like flavor. ‘Kadota’ trees prefer a warmer environment and do well with a dry climate. 

‘Little Ruby’

Close-up of ripe and green fruits on a Ficus carica ‘Little Ruby’ tree in the garden. The fruits are small with reddish skin, slightly pear-shaped.
These early-season figs are small, sweet, highly productive, and ideal for containers in humid climates.
botanical-name
botanical name


Ficus carica ‘Little Ruby’
sun-requirements
sun requirements


Full sun
height
height


4 – 6 feet
hardiness-zones
hardiness zones


6 – 10

‘Little Ruby’ is an early-season producer with excellent productivity. The fruits are small with reddish skin, pink-tinged brown flesh, and a sweet, sugary flavor. ‘Little Ruby’ develops compact, very hardy trees that do well in humid environments and are an excellent choice for container gardening. Enjoy a handful of these tasty pink fruits by early summer!

‘LSU Gold’

Close-up of ripe fruits on a Ficus carica 'LSU Gold' tree among the dark green lobed leaves illuminated by sunlight. The medium to large-sized figs of 'LSU Gold' showcase a golden-yellow skin when fully ripe.
This fig variety thrives in dry conditions, yielding large, sweet, herbal-spiced fruits.
botanical-name
botanical name


Ficus carica ‘LSU Gold’
sun-requirements
sun requirements


Full sun
height
height


8 – 15 feet
hardiness-zones
hardiness zones


6 – 10

‘LSU Gold’ is an early-season fig cultivar. It does best in a dry environment and does not perform well in humid climates. It produces large fruits with yellow skin and golden-brown flesh.

They have a sweet honey-like flavor with a hint of herbal spiciness. ‘LSU Gold’ is a productive variety with hardy, vigorous trees.

‘LSU O’Rourke’

Close-up of ripe fruits on a Ficus carica 'O'Rourke' tree among green lobed foliage. The medium to large-sized figs are characterized by their reddish-brown skin and are slightly pear-shaped.
This late-season fig variety yields pear-shaped, medium-sized fruits with a sweet, fruity flavor.
botanical-name
botanical name


Ficus carica ‘O’Rourke’
sun-requirements
sun requirements


Full sun
height
height


10 – 20 feet
hardiness-zones
hardiness zones


7 – 9

‘LSU O’Rourke’ is a late-season producer. It has a productive crop of medium-sized fruits that are slightly pear-shaped. The fruits have reddish-brown skin and pale, creamy pink flesh. The flavor is sweet and fruity.

‘LSU Purple’

Close-up of ripe fruits on a Ficus carica 'LSU Purple' tree in the garden. The medium to large-sized figs are characterized by their dark purple to almost black skin when ripe.
This early-season cultivar thrives in humidity, yielding medium-sized fruits with honey-like flavor.
botanical-name
botanical name


Ficus carica ‘LSU Purple’
sun-requirements
sun requirements


Full sun
height
height


8 – 10 feet
hardiness-zones
hardiness zones


6 – 10

‘LSU Purple’ is an early-season cultivar. These trees do best in a humid environment, producing medium-sized fruits with a sugary honey-like flavor. The fruits have purple skin with golden brown flesh. 

‘LSU Tiger’

Close-up of a branch of Ficus carica 'LSU Tiger' with lush foliage and small ripening fruits, in a sunny garden. The medium to large-sized fruits of 'LSU Tiger' features a visually striking combination of green and yellow stripes, resembling a tiger's markings. The tree itself has broad, lobed leaves of dark green color.
This early-season fig cultivar thrives in humidity, offering medium-sized, sweet, berry-like fruits.
botanical-name
botanical name


Ficus carica ‘LSU Tiger’
sun-requirements
sun requirements


Full sun
height
height


8 – 10 feet
hardiness-zones
hardiness zones


6 – 10

‘LSU Tiger’ is an early-season fig cultivar. It has medium-sized fruits with a sugary berry-like flavor. The fruits have light green skin with red flesh. ‘LSU Tiger’ fig trees perform well in humid southern environments.

‘Magnolia’

Close-up of ripe fruits on a Ficus carica ‘Magnolia’ tree in the garden. The tree produces large-sized, pear-shaped fruits with reddish skin. Some fruits are still green.
This mid-season cultivar, with medium to large fruits, suits containers and humid climates.
botanical-name
botanical name


Ficus carica ‘Magnolia’
sun-requirements
sun requirements


Full sun
height
height


4 – 10 feet
hardiness-zones
hardiness zones


7 – 11

‘Magnolia’ is a mid-season producer. It has medium to large-sized fruits with reddish skin and amber-colored flesh.

These fig trees are smaller and suitable for growing in containers. They perform well in humid environments. 

‘Marseille’

Close-up of ripe fruits on a Ficus carica ‘Marseille’ tree. The fruits are medium-sized, pear-shaped, with greenish-yellow skin. The leaves are large, lobed, gray-green in color with slightly jagged edges.
This mid-season fig yields sweet fruits with greenish-yellow skin on an average-sized tree.
botanical-name
botanical name


Ficus carica ‘Marseille’
sun-requirements
sun requirements


Full sun
height
height


10 – 12 feet
hardiness-zones
hardiness zones


6 – 9

‘Marseille’ is a mid-season producer. The fruits are sweet and have greenish-yellow skin and pale pinkish-yellow flesh. This average-sized fig tree produces a prolific crop.

‘Olympian’

Close-up of ripening fruit on a Ficus carica 'Olympian' tree in a sunny garden. The figs of 'Olympian' are medium to large in size and exhibit a striking combination of green and purple hues. The fig tree itself boasts large, deeply lobed, and glossy green leaves
This late-season fig variety yields two crops of sweet, pear-shaped fruits.
botanical-name
botanical name


Ficus carica ‘Olympian’
sun-requirements
sun requirements


Full sun
height
height


8 – 10 feet
hardiness-zones
hardiness zones


6 – 10

‘Olympian’ is a late-season cultivar that produces two crops. It does best in a dry environment and does not perform as well in humid climates.

The fruits are medium-sized, long, and somewhat pear-shaped. ‘Olympian’ fruits have speckled green and purplish-brown skin with brown flesh and a sweet sugary flavor.

‘Panache’

Close-up of ripening Ficus carica 'Panache' fruits against a blurred background. This deciduous fig tree showcases medium to large-sized fruits with a yellow-green skin adorned by prominent green stripes, resembling a tiger's stripes.
This late-season fig cultivar thrives in dry conditions and yields beautiful, striped, berry-flavored fruits.
botanical-name
botanical name


Ficus carica ‘Panache’
sun-requirements
sun requirements


Full sun
height
height


12 – 15 feet
hardiness-zones
hardiness zones


6 – 10

‘Panache’ is a late-season fig cultivar. These trees prefer a dry environment and do not perform well in humid climates. ‘Panache’ develops a productive crop of medium-sized fruits.

The fruits have a beautiful striped yellow and green skin pattern, red flesh, and a berry-like flavor. If you are looking for a fig with an ornamental “wow” factor, this would be a good choice for its showy fruits.

‘Ronde de Bordeaux’

Close-up of ripe fruits on a Ficus carica 'Ronde de Bordeaux' tree in a sunny garden. This deciduous fruit tree exhibits medium-sized, round-shaped figs with a rich, dark purple to almost black skin when ripe. The fig tree is characterized by its lush, deeply lobed green leaves that provide an attractive backdrop to the striking fruit it produces.
This very early-season fig cultivar adapted to humid areas yields abundant, medium-sized fruits with a berry-plum flavor.
botanical-name
botanical name


Ficus carica ‘Ronde de Bordeaux’
sun-requirements
sun requirements


Full sun
height
height


8 – 15 feet
hardiness-zones
hardiness zones


6 – 10

‘Ronde de Bordeaux’ is a very early-season fig cultivar. These trees are productive and reliable and perform well in a humid climate.

‘Ronde de Bordeaux’ produces an abundance of medium size fruits. The fruits have a dark reddish-black skin, red flesh, and a flavor that is a cross between berries and plums.

‘Sierra’

In a sunny garden, a close-up view unveils the delightful sight of ripening fruits on a Ficus carica 'Sierra' tree. The tree's large, deeply cut leaves, radiantly green, form an inviting canopy. The distinguishing feature of this cultivar lies in its elongated, pear-shaped fruits, showing a unique yellow-green hue. Some leaves are damaged by rust spot.
This mid-season fig cultivar thrives in dry climates, offering large, melon-flavored fruits.
botanical-name
botanical name


Ficus carica ‘Sierra’
sun-requirements
sun requirements


Full sun
height
height


10 – 15 feet
hardiness-zones
hardiness zones


7 – 10

‘Sierra’ is a mid-season producer that performs well in more dry, non-humid environments. Their large fruits taste like a cross between a melon and a berry. ‘Sierra’ fruits have yellow-green skin with faintly red stripes at maturity and golden-brown flesh. 

‘Smith’

Close-up of a gardener's hand holding two ripe Ficus carica 'Smith' fruits on a green leaf. The fruits of Ficus carica 'Smith' are elongated and pear-shaped, featuring a unique yellow hue.
This mid-season cultivar is popular in the Southeast because it thrives in warm, humid climates.
botanical-name
botanical name


Ficus carica ‘Smith’
sun-requirements
sun requirements


Full sun
height
height


10 – 20 feet
hardiness-zones
hardiness zones


7 – 10

‘Smith’ is a mid-season cultivar. It is a popular fig variety for the southeastern United States because it performs well in warm and humid environments. ‘Smith’ fruits have a yellowish skin with amber-colored flesh.

The fruits are resistant to splitting and have a taste like berry-flavored jam. This is a fast-growing tree that produces a productive fig harvest every year!

‘Violette de Bordeaux’

In a sunny garden, a close-up reveals the enchanting sight of ripening fruits on a Ficus carica 'Violette de Bordeaux' tree. The tree's large, deeply cut leaves are a lush and vibrant green. The elongated, pear-shaped fruits of this cultivar showcase a distinctive deep purple color, and green color.
This mid to late-season fig variety thrives in cooler climates, yielding flavorful, berry-like fruits.
botanical-name
botanical name


Ficus carica ‘Violette de Bordeaux’
sun-requirements
sun requirements


Full sun
height
height


10 – 20 feet
hardiness-zones
hardiness zones


6 – 10

‘Violette de Bordeaux’ bears a mid to late-season fig crop. The medium-sized fruits ripen to a dark reddish-black with reddish-purple flesh. These flavorful figs have a berry-like taste.

These trees are very productive and can be pruned small enough for container gardening. ‘Violette de Bordeaux’ performs well in cooler climates and also does well in humid environments. 

‘White Marseilles’

In a sunny garden, a close-up of ripening fruits on a Ficus carica 'White Marseilles' tree reveals a picturesque scene. The large, lobed leaves of the tree are deeply cut, exhibiting a lush and vibrant shade of green. The elongated fruits, characteristic of the 'White Marseilles' cultivar, hang gracefully from the branches, displaying a pale, creamy coloration.
This fig variety yields sweet, honey-flavored fruits.
botanical-name
botanical name


Ficus carica ‘White Marseilles’
sun-requirements
sun requirements


Full sun
height
height


10 – 15 feet
hardiness-zones
hardiness zones


6 – 10

The ‘White Marseilles’ fig tree produces an early to mid-season crop. The medium-sized fruits have a sweet, honey-like flavor.

These juicy figs have yellow skin with golden-brown flesh. ‘White Marseilles’ trees are hardy and productive, performing well in humid climates and cooler regions. 

‘Yellow Long Neck’

Close-up of ripening fruits on a Ficus carica 'Yellow Long Neck' tree in a sunny garden. The tree showcases large, lobed leaves that are deeply cut and bright green. The fruits of this cultivar are elongated and possess a unique yellow hue.
This late-season fig variety stays small and grows well in containers.
botanical-name
botanical name


Ficus carica ‘Yellow Long Neck’
sun-requirements
sun requirements


Full sun
height
height


8 – 10 feet
hardiness-zones
hardiness zones


7 – 10

The ‘Yellow Long Neck’ is a late-season cultivar. These trees stay fairly small and can be pruned to grow in a container. The fruits are sweet and honey-flavored.

‘Yellow Long Neck’ fruits have an elongated pear-like shape with yellow skin and amber-colored flesh. The trees are fairly cold-hardy and should perform well in various environmental conditions. 

Frequently Asked Questions

Many fig varieties are self-pollinating and do not need another fig tree planted nearby. When you purchase a fig tree from a nursery or garden center, it will be one of the more common varieties. The common commercially available fig varieties will produce plenty of fruits with just one tree. However, if you have enough space, plant two different cultivars so you can enjoy the uniqueness of each one!

Your fig tree may produce more than you can eat. Some ideas to help you deal with your surplus harvest include:

  • Share them with your friends and neighbors.
  • Freeze them. Frozen figs make a great addition to smoothies!
  • Dry them. Figs make excellent dried fruits.
  • Can them. There are plenty of delicious recipes for canned figs.
  • Cook with them. Try a new recipe and add some figs for extra flavor.

Yes, you can easily propagate a fig tree via cuttings. Take cuttings in late winter or early spring while the tree is still dormant. Cuttings should be at most 10 to 12 inches long. Dip the cut end in rooting hormone and plant it about six inches deep. You can plant it directly into a large container outside so you can keep an eye on it while it starts to take root and grow on its own.

Figs should always be picked as soon as they become ripe. If you leave them hanging on the tree, they will continue ripening very quickly and will easily spoil and start to ferment. Even if you pick more figs than you can eat, it’s best to remove ripe figs from the tree rather than allow them to hang, become over-ripe, and attract pests.

Fig trees contain a white, milky sap with an irritant known as furocoumarins. If you touch this white sap with your fingers, hands, and arms while harvesting figs, for example, it can cause skin irritation. It may feel like a burning or itchy sensation that typically begins several hours after exposure. Always wash your hands well after handing your fig tree; better yet, wear gloves and a long-sleeved shirt to protect yourself. Some people don’t seem to react to this milky sap, but if you do, you can easily protect yourself while harvesting your figs.

Final Thoughts

If you love to eat figs and live in a temperate climate, particularly in USDA zone 6 or warmer, you may be pleasantly surprised that you can grow your own figs! Fig trees are easy to grow and produce abundant sweet and flavorful fruits. When you start to explore all the different varieties of figs available to the home gardener, you will discover many unique looks and flavors, but in the end, they are all figs and delicious!



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